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Monday, August 3, 2020 | History

4 edition of Coleridge And The Moral Tendency Of His Writings found in the catalog.

Coleridge And The Moral Tendency Of His Writings

by Trow Levitt

  • 323 Want to read
  • 6 Currently reading

Published by Kessinger Publishing, LLC .
Written in English


The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages118
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL10520085M
ISBN 100548176817
ISBN 109780548176818
OCLC/WorldCa179779076

In his Politics, Aristotle described how the labor of slaves and women in the oikos enables citizens to have the leisure necessary to act with virtue in the Harrington, the most important of the seventeenth-century English republican philosophers, developed this same idea in his Oceana (). As J.G.A. Pocock argued in his seminal study of the modern republican Cited by: 2. His main work on political institutions, Considerations on Representative Government, appeared in , and in the same year he wrote for Fraser’s Magazine a set of essays on moral philosophy (b) which came out as a book, Utilitarianism, in

That is Coleridge-speak for the simple idea that education is the science of relations. Just as Charlotte Mason places “education is the science of relations” at the head of her method, Coleridge says that the idea upon which his plan is predicated is “the moral origin and tendency of all true Science.” This is equivalent to the.   For his writings on education and "educing" the powers of self, see Collected Letters of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, ed. Earl Leslie Grigggs, 6 vols (Oxford: Clarendon Press, ), CL, V, , , CL, VI, , (all subsequent references to Coleridge's letters are taken from this edition), and Essays on the Principles of Method, The.

  3) Many studies of Coleridge focus on his early poetry, and while your book pays due attention to what you call his ‘imagination period’ (–), your focus is on the later part of his life (a second phase, stretching from –30, examining the philosophy of ideas, and an overlapping third phase, covering –34, focusing on. Full text of "Coleridge's essays & lectures on Shakespeare: & some other old poets & dramatists" See other formats.


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Coleridge And The Moral Tendency Of His Writings by Trow Levitt Download PDF EPUB FB2

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Mitchell, William, Coleridge. New York, Leavitt, Trow, (OCoLC) Online version: Mitchell, William. COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle.

This new volume demonstrates the extent and diversity of Coleridge's writings on the sublime. It highlights the development of his aesthetic of transcendence from an initial emphasis on the infinite progressiveness of humanity, through a fascination with landscape as half-revealing the infinite forces underlying it, and with literature as producing a similar feeling of the.

Coleridge sees his distinction between these faculties, inspired in part by Wordsworth’s writings, as part of a broader historical tendency, concomitant with cultural and linguistic refinement, to “desynonymize” words that originally shared the same meaning (BL, I, 82–83).

It is not, however, until the thirteenth chapter, “On the. The literary life of Coleridge, who is everywhere "restlessly scheming to apprehend the absolute," was "a disinterested struggle against the application of the relative spirit to moral and religious questions"; happily, Coleridge failed, for his "was a struggle.

Like most educated young radicals of his generation, Coleridge could not avoid Godwin’s bombshell of a book, An Enquiry Concerning Political Justice (). Godwin began with Paine’s argument that the government was a necessary evil, but. The Challenge of Coleridge.

Ethics and Interpretation in Romanticism and Modern Philosophy. David Haney “For those who are already well versed in Romanticism and contemporart theory, the book will be a welcome addition to ongoing discussions, for it continues to develop, even while refining Haney’s project of exploring the relationship between hermeneutics and ethics Author: David Haney.

The world created by Coleridge in his whole poem of ‘The Ancient Mariner’ is the best example of this faculty of Coleridge.

J.L. Lowes’ book ‘The Road to Xanadu’ amply illustrates how Coleridge’s imagination could transform simple facts collected during his. David P. Haney's grasp not only of Coleridge but also of the array of thinkers past and present he orchestrates together for a dialogue among themselves and Coleridge is impressive.

The book explores the reciprocal relationship between ethics and the reading of texts, between the moral dimension of our interpretive efforts and the interpretive 3/5(1).

Interweaving past and present texts, The Challenge of Coleridge engages the British Romantic poet, critic, and philosopher Samuel Taylor Coleridge in a "conversation" (in Hans-Georg Gadamer's sense) with philosophical thinkers today who share his interest in the relationship of interpretation to ethics and whose ideas can be both illuminated and challenged by Coleridge's Cited by: 6.

I have said that Wordsworth is not a specifically Christian poet, and we shall look through his writings in vain for any evidence that he intended to teach the details of Christian doctrine.

Yet the spirit of his poetry is the spirit of Christianity, and that in spite of the fact that he felt it his mission to be the poet of nature. Samuel Taylor Coleridge (21 October - 25 July ) was an English poet, literary critic, and philosopher who, with his friend William Wordsworth, was a founder of the Romantic Movement in England and a member of the Lake Poets.

Coleridge, son of the vicar and schoolmaster of Ottery St. Mary, Devonshire, was born there inthe youngest of 13 children. He was at Christ's Literary movement: Romanticism. Carafiol believes that Marsh was no Transcendentalist (Transcendent Reason xv), and while a pivotal figure, he is simply a marginal one who understood what Coleridge's Aids to Reflection had to offer American religion; John J.

Duffy believes that James Marsh was a disciple of Coleridge as evidenced by the title of his book Coleridge's American.

Richard Holmes's Coleridge: Early Visions won the Whitbread Book of the Year dge: Darker Reflections, the long-awaited second volume, chronicles the last thirty years of his career (), a period of domestic and professional marriage foundered, his opium addiction increased, he quarreled bitterly with Wordsworth, and his son, Pages: Unlike most of the English Romantics, who wrote predominantly either in verse or in prose, Robert Southey—like his friend and brother-in-law Samuel Taylor Coleridge and, to some extent, Sir Walter Scott—was both poet and prose writer and one as fully as the other.

Of his fellow Romantics he was perhaps the most versatile, as well as one of the most prolific. Coleridge s tendency to use Christian arguments as the cohesive force that would secure the unity of his theory made Coleridge over-emphasize the spiritual dimension at the cost of the intellectual and thus fascilitate a significant shift in thinking, which was responsible for the creative misinterpretation of his theories by the next.

In the years following the Theory, Coleridge continued to wrestle with these problems. His marginal writings and notebooks offer vivid testimony to his ongoing negotiations between life and the absolute.

Coleridge did not only work in isolation, however. Beginning inhe met weekly with surgeon and student of idealism J. Green. MILL, BENTHAM, AND UTILITARIANISM. It is natural for discussions of Mill’s variations from Benthamism to start with evidence of his discontent or restiveness under Bentham’s rule, and the main documents called in to supply that evidence are the Autobiography and the essays on Bentham and on Coleridge.

As one reads Mill’s retrospective account of what he himself was. William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge had vastly different writing styles as well as opinions of the material they treated in their writing.

One of the primary differences between the two is how each treats nature in his work. Wordsworth, in his self-proclaimed writing like the common man. Biographia Literaria by Samuel Taylor Coleridge Its easy to link to paragraphs in the Full Text Archive If this page contains some material that you want to link to but you don't want your visitors to have to scroll down the whole page just hover your mouse over the relevent paragraph and click the bookmark icon that appears to the left of it.

Coleridge's 'Literary Remains', vol. 3, comprising previously unpublished philosophy, musings and fragments, now available as are vols. 1 and 2, in html form, as a free download from Project Gutenberg.Coleridge: Critic of Colmer.

Oxford University Press. 30/. in many ways this is a useful book, though more so to the “student” perhaps than to “the general reader”, for both of whom it is apparently intended. Much of Coleridge’s work is out of print or otherwise difficult to obtain and until the re-publication of his writings (now under way) is completed, Mr.

Colmer’s.His marginal notes are less frequent and voluminous in the later part of the book than in the earlier; but they are throughout lively, and give a far clearer and more complete picture of Coleridge's attitude toward that historic treatise than any of his writings that have yet ap-peared in print.

The first note shows that Coleridge approached.